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The Art of Cookery Continued: Chapter II: Made Dishes, Part 1

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Houmas House, rvfoodies-com

From rvfoodies.com, Houmas House, Lousianna – an 18th century kitchen

The next chapter of Hannah Glasse’s cook book is one of the longest; with most having no oven to bake in, it is little wonder that most cooked meats were either boiled, spitted and roasted, or booked in a stew-pan or sauteed.  They served every part of the animal, from entrails neatly presented to split skulls (with specific directions for how to lay the tongue most becomingly…).  I doubt many modern westerners would be able to stomach a large portion of the English haute cuisine (excuse the pun).  Here’s the first part of Chapter 2, “Made Dishes”:

To dress Scotch collops*.

Take veal, cut it thin, beat it well with the back of a knife or rolling pin, and grate some nutmeg over them ; dip them in the yolk of an egg, and fry them in a little butter till they are of a fine brown; then pour the butter from them, and have ready half a pint of gravy, a little piece of butter rolled in flour, a few mushrooms, a glass of white wine, the yolk of an egg, and a little cream mixed together.  If it wants a little salt, put it in.  Stir it together, and when it is of a fine thickness dish it up.  It does very well without the cream, if you have none; and very well without gravy, only put in just as much warm water, and either red or white wine.

[* collops – a small piece of meat, either thin slices or minced meat of either beef, lamb or venison.]

To dress white Scotch collops.

Do not dip them in egg, but fry them till they are tender, but not brown.  Take your meat out of the pan, and pour all out, then put in your meat again, as above, only you must put in some cream.

[* collops – a small piece of meat, either thin slices or minced meat of either beef, lamb or venison.]

To dress a fillet of veal with collops.

For an alteration, take a small fillet of veal, cut what collops you want, then take the udder and fill it with force-meat, roll it round, tie it with a pack thread across, and roast it; lay your collops in the dish, nd lay your udder in the middle.  Garnish your dishes with lemon.

[* collops – a small piece of meat, either thin slices or minced meat of either beef, lamb or venison.]

To make force-meat balls.

Now you are to observe, that force-meat balls are a great addition to all made dishes; made thus:  take half a pound of veal, and half a pound of suet, cut fine, and beat in a marble mortar or wooden bowl; have a few suet-herbs shred fine, a little mace dried and beat find, a small nutmeg grated, or half a large one, a little lemon peel cut very fine, a little pepper and salt, and the yolks of two eggs; mix all this well together, then roll them in little round balls, and some in little long balls; roll them in flour, and fry them brown.  If they are for anything of white sauce, put a little water on in a saucepan, and when the water boils put them in, and let them boil for a few minutes, but never fry them for white sauce.

Truffles and morels good in sauces and soups.

Take half an ounce of truffles and morels, simmer them in two or three spoonfuls of water for a few minutes, then put them with the liquor into the sauce.  They thicken both sauce and soup, and give it a fine flavour.

To stew ox-palates.

Stew them very tender; which must be done by putting them into cold water, and let them stew very softly over a slow fire till they are tender, then cut them into pieces and put them either into your made-dish or soup; and cocks-combs and artichoke-bottoms, cut small, and put into the made dish.  Garnish your dishes with lemon, sweetbreads* stewed or white dishes, and fried for brown ones, and cut in little pieces.

[*Culinary names for the thymus (throat, gullet, or neck) or the pancreas (also heart, stomach, or belly) especially of the calf (ris de veau) and lamb (ris d’agneau) (although beef and pork sweetbreads are also eaten).]

To ragoo a leg of mutton.

Take all the skin and fat off, cut it very thin the right way of the grain, then butter your stew-pan, and shake some flour into it; slice half a lemon and half an onion, cut them very small, a little bundle of sweet herbs, and a blade of mace.  Put all together with your meat into the pan, stir it a minute or two, and then put in six spoonfuls of gravy, and have ready an anchovy minced small; mix it with some butter and flour, stir it altogether for six minutes, and then dish it up.

To make a brown fricasey.

You must take your rabbits or chickens and skin them, then cut them into small pieces, and rub them over with yolks of eggs.  Have ready some grated bread, a little beaten mace, and a little grated nutmeg mixt together, and then roll them in it: put a little butter into your stew-pan, and when it is melted put in your meat.  Fry it of a fine brown, and take care they don’t stick to the bottom of the pan, then pour the butter from them, and pour in half a pint of gravy, a glass of red wine, a few mushrooms, or two spoonfuls of the pickle, a little salt (if wanted) and a piece of butter rolled in flour.  When it is of a fine thickness dish it up, and sent it to table.

To make a white fricasey.

You may take two chickens or rabbits, skin them and cut them into little pieces.  Lay them into warm water to draw out all the blood, and then lay them in a clean cloth to dry:  put them into a stew-pan with milk and water, stew them till they are tender, and then take a clean pan, put in half a pint of cream, and a quarter of a pound of butter; stir it together till the butter is melted, but you must be sure to keep it stirring all the time r it will be greasy, and then with a fork take the chickens or rabbits out of the stew-pan and put into the sauce-pan to the butter and cream.  Have ready a little mace dried and beat fine, a very little nutmeg, a few mushrooms, shake all together for a minute or two, and dish it up.  If you have no mushrooms a spoonful of the pickle does full as well, and gives it a pretty tartness.  This is a very pretty sauce for a breast of veal roasted.

To fricasey chickens, rabbits, lamb, veal, &c.

Do them the same way.

A second way to make a white fricasey.

You must take two or three rabbits or chickens, skin them, and lay them in warm water, and dry them with a clean cloth.  Put them into a stew-pan with a blade or two of mace, a little black and white pepper, an onions, a little bundle of sweet-herbs, and do but just cover them with water:  stew them till they are tender, then with a fork take them out, strain the liquor, and put them into the pan again with half a pint of the liquor and half a pint of cream, the yolk of two eggs beat well, half a nutmeg grated, a glass of white wine, a little piece of butter rolled in flour, and a gill* of mushrooms; keep stirring all together, all the while one way, till it is smooth and of a fine thickness, and then dish it up.  Add what you please.

[*liquid measure (commonly a half-pint)]

A third way of making a white fricasey.

Take three chickens, skin them, cut them into small pieces; that is, every joint asunder; lay them in warm water, for a quarter of an hour, take them out and dry them with a cloth, then put them into a stew-pan with milk and water, and boil them tender:  take a pint of good cream, a quarter of a pound of butter, and stir it till it is thick, then let it stand till it is cool, and put to it a little beaten mace, half a nutmeg grated, a little salt, a gill* of white wine, and a few mushrooms; stir all together, then take the chickens out of the stew-pan, throw away what they are boiled in, clean the pan and put in the chickens and sauce together:  keep the pan shaking round till they are quite hot, and dish them up.  Garnish with lemon.  They will be very good without wine.

[*liquid measure (commonly a half-pint)]

To fricasey rabbits, lamb, sweetbreads, or tripe.

Do the same way.

Another way to fricasey tripe.

Take a piece of double tripe, cut it into slices two inches long, and half an inch broad, put them into your stew-pan, and sprinkle a little salt over them; then put in a bunch of sweet-herbs, a little lemon-peel, an onion, a little anchovy pickle, and a bay-leaf; put all these to the tripe, then put in just water enough to cover them, and let them stew till the trip is very tender:  then take out the tripe and strain the liquor out, shred a spoonful of capers, and put to them a glass of white wine, and half a pint of the liquor they are stewed in.  Let it boil a little while, then put in your tripe, and beat the yolks of three eggs; put into your eggs a little mace, two cloves, a little nutmeg dried and beat fine, a small handful of parsley picked and shred fine, a piece of butter rolled in flour, and a quarter of a pint of cream:  mix all these well together, and put them into your stew-pan, keep them stirring one way all the while, and when it is of a fine thickness and smooth, dish it up, and garnish the dish with lemon.  You are to observe that all sauces which have eggs or cream in, you must keep stirring one way all the while they are on the fire, or they would turn to curds.  You may add white walnut pickle, or mushrooms, in the room of capers, just to make your sauce a little tart.

To ragoo hogs feet and ears.

Take your feet and ears out of the pickle they are soused in, or boil them till they are tender, then cut them into little long thin bits about two inches long, and about a quarter of an inch thick:  put them into your stew-pan with half a pint of good gravy, a glass of white wine, a good deal of mustard, a good piece of butter rolled in flour, and a little pepper and salt:  stir all together till it is of a fine thickness, and then dish it up.

Note, they make a very pretty dish fried with butter and mustard, and a little good gravy, if you like it.  Then only cut the feet and ears in two.  You may add half an onions, cut small.

To fry tripe.

Cut your tripe into pieces about three inches long, dip them in the yolk of an egg and a few crums of bread, fry them of a fine brown, and then take them out of the pan and lay them in a dish to drain.  Have ready a arm dish to put them in, and send them to table, with butter and mustard in a cup.

To stew tripe.

Cut it just as you do for frying, and set on some water in a sauce-pan, with two or three onions cut into slices, and some salt.  When it boils, put in your tripe.  Ten minutes will boil it.  Send it to table with the liquor in the dish, and the onions.  Have butter and mustard in a cup, and dish it up.  You may put in as many onions as you like to mix with your sauce, or leave them quite out, just as you please.  Put a little bundle of sweet-herbs, and a piece of lemon-peel into the water, when you put in your tripe.

A fricasey of pigeons.

Take eight pigeons, new killed, cut them into small pieces, and put them into a stew-pan with a pint of claret and a pint of water.  Season your pigeons with salt and pepper, a blade or two of mace, an onion, a bundle of sweet-herbs, a good piece of butter just rolled in a very little flour:  cover it close, and let them stew till there is just enough for sauce, and then take out the onions and sweet-herbs, beat up the yolks of three eggs, grate half a nutmeg in, and with your spoon push the meat all to one side of the pan and the gravy to the other side, and stir in the eggs; keep them stirring for fear of turning to curds, and when the sauce is fine and thick shake all together, put in half a spoonful of vinegar, and give them a shake; then put the meat into the dish, pour the sauce over it, and have ready some slices of bacon toasted, and fried oysters; throw the oysters all over, and lay the bacon round.  Garnish with lemon.

A fricasey of lamb-stones and sweetbreads.

Have ready some lamb-stones blanched, parboiled and sliced, and flour two or three sweetbreads*; if very thick, cut them in two, the yolks of six hard eggs whole; a few pistachio-nut kernels, and a few large oysters:  fry these all of a fine brown, then pour out all the butter, and add a pint of drawn gravy, the lamb-stones, some asparagus tops about an inch long, some grated nutmeg, a little pepper and salt, two shallots shred small, and a glass of white wine.  Stew all these together for ten minutes, then add the yolks of six eggs beat very fine, with a little white wine, and a little beaten mace; stir altogether till it is of a fine thickness, and then dish it up.  Garnish with lemon.

[*Culinary names for the thymus (throat, gullet, or neck) or the pancreas (also heart, stomach, or belly) especially of the calf (ris de veau) and lamb (ris d’agneau) (although beef and pork sweetbreads are also eaten).]

To hash a calf’s head.

Boil the head almost enough, then take the best half and with a sharp knife take it nicely from the bone, with the two eyes.  Lay it in a little deep dish before a good fire, and take great care no ashes fall into it, and then hack it with a knife cross and cross:  grate some nutmeg all over, a very little pepper and salt, a few sweet herbs, some crumbs of bread, and a little lemon-peel chopped very fine, baste it with a little butter, then baste it again, and pour over it the yolks of two eggs; keep the dish turning that it may be all brown alike:  cut the other half and tongue into little thin bits, and set on a pint of drawn gravy in a sauce-pan, a little bundle of sweet-herbs, an onions, a little pepper and salt, a glass of red wine, and two shallots; boil all these together, a few minutes, then strain it through a sieve, and put it into a clean stew-pan with the hash.  Flour the meat before you put it in, and put in a few mushrooms, a spoonful of the pickle, two spoonfuls of catchup, and a few truffles and morels; stir all these together for a few minutes, then beat up half the brains, and stir into the stew-pan, and a little piece of butter rolled in flour.  Take the other half of the brains and beat them up with a little lemon-peel cut fine, a little nutmeg grated, a little beaten mace, a little thyme shred small, a little parsley, the yolk of an egg, and have some good dripping boiling in a stew-pan; then fry the brains in little cakes, about as big as a crown-piece.  Fry about twenty oysters dipped in the yolk of an egg, toast some slices of bacon, fry a few force-meat balls, and have ready a hot dish; if pewter, over a few clear coals; if china, over a pan of hot water.  Pour in your hash, then lay in your toasted head, throw the force-meat-balls over the hash, and garnish the dish with fried oysters, the fried brains, and lemon; throw the rest over the hash, lay the bacon round the dish, and send it to table.

To hash a calf’s head white.

Take half a pint of gravy, a large wine-glass of white wine, a little beaten mace, a little nutmeg, and a little salt; throw into your hash a few mushrooms, a few truffles and morels first parboiled, a few artichoke bottoms, and asparagus tops, if you have them, a good piece of butter rolled in flour, the yolks of two eggs, half a pint of cream, and one spoonful of mushroom catchup; stir it all together very carefully till it is of a fine thickness; then pour it into sour dish, and lay the other half of the head as before-mentioned, in the middle, and garnish it as before directed, with fried oysters, brains, lemon, and force-meat balls fried.

To bake a calf’s head.

Take the head, pick it and wash it very clean; take an earthen dish large enough to lay the head on, rub a little piece of butter all over the dish, then lay some long iron skewers across the top of the dish, and lay the head atop them; skewer up the meat in the middle that it don’t lie on the dish, then grate some nutmeg all over it, a few sweet herbs shred small, some crumbs of bread, a little lemon-peel cut fine, and then flour it all over:  stick pieces of butter in the eyes and all over the head, and flour it again.  Let it be well baked, and of a fine brown; you may throw a little pepper and salt over it, and put into the dish a piece of beef cut small, a bundle of sweet-herbs, an onion, some whole pepper, a blade of mace, two cloves, a pint of water, and boil the brains with some sage.  When the head is enough, lay it on a dish, and set it to the fire to keep warm, then stir all together in the dish, and boil it in a sauce-pan; strain it off, put it into the sauce-pan again, add a piece of butter rolled in flour, and the sage in the brains chopped fine, a spoonful of catchup, and two spoonfuls of red wine; boil them together, take the brains, beat them well, and mix then with the sauce:  pour it into the dish, and send it to table.  You must bake the tongue with the head, and don’t cut it out.  It will lie the handsomer in the dish.

To bake a sheep’s head.

Do it the same way, and it eats very well.

To dress a lamb’s head.

Boil the head and pluck tender but don’t let the liver be too much done.  Take the head up, hack it cross and cross with a knife, grate some nutmeg over it, and lay it in a dish, before a good fire; then grate some crumbs of bread, some sweet-herbs rubbed, a little lemon-peel chopped fine, a very little pepper and salt, and baste it with a little butter:  then throw a little flour over it, and just as it is done do the same, baste it and drudge it.  Take half the liver, the lights*, the heart and tongue, chop them very small, with six or eight spoonfuls of gravy or water; first shake some flour over the meat, and stir it together, then put in the gravy or water, a good piece of butter rolled in a little flour, a little pepper and salt, and what runs from the head in the dish; simmer all together a few minutes, and add half a spoonful of vinegar, pour it into your dish, lay the head in the middle of the mince-meat,  have ready the other half of the liver cut thin, with some slices of bacon broiled, and lay round the head.  Garnish the dish with lemon, and send it to table.

[*lights = lungs]

To ragoo a neck of veal.

Cut a neck of veal into steaks, flatten them with a rolling-pin, season them with salt, pepper, cloves and mace, lard them with bacon, lemon-peel and thyme, dip them in the yolks of eggs, make a sheet of strong cap-paper up at the four corners in the form of a dripping-pan; pin up the corners, butter the paper and also the gridiron, and set it over a fire of charcoal; put in your meat, let it do leisurely, keep it basting and turning to keep in the gravy; and when it is enough have ready half a pint of strong gravy, season it high, put in mushrooms and pickles, force-meat balls dipped in the yolks of eggs, oysters stewed and fried, to lay round and at the top of your dish, and then serve it up.  If for a brown ragoo, put in red wine.  If for a white one, put in white wine, with the yolks of eggs beat up with two or three spoonfuls of cream.

To ragoo a breast of veal.

Take your breast of veal, put it into a large stew-pan, put in a bundle of sweet-herbs, an onions, some black and white pepper, a blade or two of mace, two or three cloves, a very little piece of lemon peel, and just cover it with water:  when it is tender take it up, bone it, put in the bones, boil it up till the gravy is very good, then strain it off, and if you have a little rich beef gravy add a quarter of a pint, put in half an ounce of truffles and morels, a spoonful or two of catchup, two or three spoonfuls of white wine, and let them all boil together:  in the mean time flour the veal, and fry it in butter till it is of a fine brown, then drain out all the butter and pour the gravy you are boiling to the veal, with a few mushrooms:  boil all together till the sauce is rich and thick, and cut the sweetbread* into four.  A few force-meat balls is proper in it.  Lay the veal in the dish, and pour the sauce all over it.  Garnish with lemon.

[*Culinary names for the thymus (throat, gullet, or neck) or the pancreas (also heart, stomach, or belly) especially of the calf (ris de veau) and lamb (ris d’agneau) (although beef and pork sweetbreads are also eaten).]

Another way to ragoo a breast of veal.

You may bone it nicely, flour it, and fry it of a fine brown, then pour the fat out of the pan, and the ingredients as above, with the bones; when enough, take it out, and strain the liquor, then put in your meat again, with the ingredients, as before directed.

A breast of veal in hodge-podge.

Take a breast of veal, cut the briscuit into little pieces, and every bone asunder, then flour it, and put half a pound of good butter into a stew-pan; when it is hot, throw in the veal, fry it all over of a fine light brown, and then have ready a tea-kettle of water boiling; pour it in the stew-pan, fill it up and stir it round, throw in a pint of green peas, a fine lettuce whole, clean washed, two or three blades of mace, a little whole pepper tied in a muffin rag, a little bundle of sweet herbs, a small onion stuck with a few cloves, and a little salt.  Cover it close, and let it stew an hour, or till it is boiled to your palate, if you would have soup made of it; if you would only have sauce to eat with the veal, you must stew it till there is just as much as you would have for sauce, and season it with salt to your palate; take out the onions, sweet-herbs and spice, and pour it altogether into your dish.  It is a fine dish.  If you have no pease, pare three or four cucumbers, scoop out the pulp, and cut it into little pieces, and take four or five heads of celery, clean washed, and cut the white part small; when you have no lettuces, take the little hearts of savoys, or the little young sprouts that grow on the old cabbage-stalks about as big as the top of your thumb.

Note, if you would make a very fine dish of it, fill the inside of your lettuce with force-meat, and tie the top close with a thread; stew it till there is but just enough for sauce, set the lettuce in the middle, and the veal round, and pour the sauce all over it.  Garnish your dish with rasped bread, made into figures with your fingers.  This is the cheapest way of dressing a breast of veal to be good, and serve a number of people.

To collar a breast of veal.

Take a very sharp knife, and nicely take out all the bones, but take great care you do not cut the meat through; pick all the fat and meat off the bones, then grate some nutmeg all over the inside of the veal, a very little beaten mace, a little pepper and salt, a few sweet-herbs shred small, some parsley, a little lemon-peel shred small, a few crumbs of bread and the bits of fat picked off the bones; roll it up tight, stick one skewer in to hold it together, but do it clever, that it stands upright in the dish: tie a packthread across it to hold it together, spit it, then roll the caul* all round it, and roast it.  An hour and a quarter will do it.  When it has been about an hour at the fire take off the caul, dredge it with flour, baste it well with fresh butter, and let it be of a fine brown.  Four sauce take two penny-worth of gravy beef, cut it and hack it well, then flour it, fry it a little brown, then pour into your stew pan some boiling water, stir it well together, then fill your pan two parts full of water, put in an onion, a bundle of sweet herbs, a little crust of bread toasted, two or three blades of mace, four cloves, some whole pepper, and the bones of the veal.  Cover it close, and let it stew till it is quite rich and thick; then strain it, boil it up with some truffles and morels, a few mushrooms, a spoonful of catchup, two or three bottoms of artichokes, if you have them; add a little salt, just enough to season the gravy, take the packthread off the veal, and set it upright in the dish; cut the sweetbread* into four, and broil it of a fine brown, with a few force-meat-balls fried; lay these round the dish, and pour in the sauce.  Garnish the dish with lemon, and send it to table.

[*Caul :  The membrane.

*Culinary names for the thymus (throat, gullet, or neck) or the pancreas (also heart, stomach, or belly) especially of the calf (ris de veau) and lamb (ris d’agneau) (although beef and pork sweetbreads are also eaten).]

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About Trinity

A melancholic pragmatist with a wide streak of mischief and an active imagination that turns into novels.

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