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Category Archives: Cuisine of the Past

Quintus Quotes: Groucho Marx

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Groucho Marx is probably one of the most famous, and most recognizable, comedians of the 20th Century. Here are a few of my favourite quotes, along with a bit of history on the man himself. Enjoy!

Stephanie Huesler

Julius Henry Marx (1890-1977) is best known as Groucho Marx, a member of the Marx Brothers comedy group (along with three of his brothers, Harpo,and Chico and Zeppo).  He was known for his rapid-fire wit and snappy comebacks.

He also once said, “I get credit all the time for things I never said.”  A case in point is a quote that is famously attributed to him, though he denied ever having said:  When Marx was hosting a television show called You Bet Your Life, he asked a contestant why she had chosen to raise such a large family (19 children), to which she is said to have replied, “I love my husband”.  Marx supposedly retorted, “I love my cigar, but I take it out of my mouth once in awhile.” Though the show was pre-recorded for editing purposes (he was known for innuendo-laced remarks), there was never any footage…

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Happy New Year!

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happy-new-year

A Blast from the Past: 1906

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Originally posted on Stephanie Huesler:
Living in the Cyber Age, it’s easy to forget that personal computers only came into existence for the mass market in 1981 (and even then, didn’t become common household items until the early 1990s), with the launch of the IBM Personal Computer (they coined that term, and the shortened “PC”). …

Houdini’s Ultimate Disappearing Act

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Houdini’s Ultimate Disappearing Act

A bit of a Whodunnit on Houdini. Enjoy!

A R T L▼R K

On the 24th of October 1926, the legendary U.S. magician Harry Houdini (Hungarian-Jewish born Erik Weisz, 1874 – 1926) performed his last show at the Garrick Theatre in Detroit, Michigan. A week later he laid dead in a local hospital. The reasons for his passing away have been subject to numerous urban myths, yet the truth could not be more ordinary and gratuitous.

Houdini was the first superstar escapist known for stunts involving underwater straightjackets, beer barrels, chains, ropes, handcuffs, being buried alive, prison breaks, even escaping from the belly of a beached whale! Throughout his life, he had constantly invited his audiences to find him insurmountable challenges and so, unsurprisingly, his death mystified the public. In Houdini!!!: The Career of Ehrich Weiss (1997), Kenneth Silverman points out the misconception that Houdini died in the famed “Chinese Water Tank trick”, or shortly after being freed from the…

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Olive Oil

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Originally posted on Travel Notes & Creative Writings:
Olive Oil – that most ancient of liquors Pic – España Es Cultura It is currently thought that olive oil was produced domestically around the Mediterranean as early as 2500 BC. Squeezed and drawn from the green and purplish fruit that hang in pendulous bunches amidst silver-green…

The Village That Died For D-Day

The Village That Died For D-Day

Here’s a fascinating look into the history of the village of Tyneham, England, which died when the population was forced to evacuate in 1943. Enjoy learning about its legacy.

derrickjknight

CLICK ON IMAGES TO ENLARGE. REPEAT IF REQUIRED.

Space for greenhouse

This morning, Aaron and Sean cleared space for the anticipated greenhouse. Holly and Bay trees were cut back and Jackie’s old work corner dismantled.

Jackie contemplating space for greenhouse

The sun danced over Jackie’s head as she contemplated the opening.

This afternoon Jackie drove us to Tyneham in Dorset and back.

Now uninhabited for the last 73 years, Tyneham was a thriving village from a previous age, until the villagers were ordered to leave their homes as part of the war effort in 1943. They were never allowed back. Today the remnants of this community were swarming with visitors.

Tyneham Century of Change

The story of its century of change is fixed to a wall near the telephone box. All will become clear when this photograph is enlarged.

Tyneham Village 1

The Tyneham Phone Box story

The replaced telephone box bears it own story,

Post Office

as does the shell of the Post Office.

Tyneham Village 3

Most of the buildings are now ruined husks

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M*A*S*H … the real thing in 1951.

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A great article on the history of MASH units, with great illustrations! Enjoy

1951 Club

M*A*S*H … the real thing in 1951.

M-A-S-H_TV_title_screen

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