RSS Feed

Tag Archives: Writing

Historical Research Treasure Trove

Posted on

printIn researching my present manuscript, I’ve come across quite a few books that are out of print, but perpetuated on the internet.  [Gutenberg Press is a great site for finding such treasures, and many (if not all!) are in Kindle format as well as other formats such as PDF.  Even if you don’t have a Kindle, you can download their free app to your PC, tab or smart phone; all you need is an Amazon account.]

Here are a few of the titles I’ve found on Gutenberg that are pertinent to the current novel I’m writing:

  • Workhouse Characters, by Margaret Wynne
  • A Sailor of King George, by Captain Frederick Hoffmann
  • From Powder Monkey to Admiral, by William Henry Giles Kingston
  • From Workhouse to Westminster, by George Haw
  • Midshipman Easy, by Frederick Marryat
  • Over the Sliprails, by Henry Lawson
  • Sea-Power and Other Studies by Sir Cyprian Bridge
  • The British Navy Book, by Cyril Field
  • The Fortunate Foundlings, by Eliza Fowler Haywood
  • The Sailor’s Word Book, by W.H. Smyth
  • The Shanty Book, Part I – Sailor Shanties, by Richard Runciman Terry
  • Two Years Before the Mast, by Richard Henry Dana
  • Types of Naval Officers, by A.T. Mahan

Not all of these books are in the era that I need for my particular story, but their historical value is nonetheless valuable.  I’m working my way through this list, as I can and as my research needs dictate, but if you’re interested in any of these topics, take a look at Gutenberg Press!

Back in the Land of the Living

Posted on

Cardinal 2, Kindle DimensionsHi everyone!  I took a much-needed break from the computer, after launching my two novels in November – The Cardinal, Part One and Part Two!  The response has been great – one reader even compared the novel to the Hobbit and the Indiana Jones sagas!  It’s an interesting “juxtaposition” for me as the author to be compared to such works… I would never presume to say it, but if readers draw that comparison then it proves that the novel has taken on a life of its own.  That’s part of the letting go process for the author; it’s hard to let your baby go, and allow it to form opinions in others’ minds that might be different to how I envisioned the character; but if I did my job right, their image is not much different than my own, at the end of the day.  My aim at writing a visually rich landscape may be what led to that Hobbity comparison…  For more information, check out the Cardinal page!

Now that the books are out, I’m still involved with them – marketing, updating online bibliographies, etc.  Once the dust settles with that aspect, I can sink my teeth into the next project:  The third book of the Northing Trilogy.  This book will take me back to the workhouse orphanages of Britain in the mid-18th century, as well as aboard a military ship; it will be dealing with aspects of lives at the opposite ends of the social scale, how they collide and how they converge.  A lot of my research will end up splashing out here on Undusted!  This week I’ve been outlining Acts 1-3, and already the list of research questions to answer warrants a trip to London.  It’s a rough life, being an author… So now that I’m back in the land of the living, I look forward to blogging and researching, and sinking my teeth into the next epic tale!

%d bloggers like this: